In answering a certified question from the Ninth Circuit, the Arizona Supreme Court has held that, where the policy contains no duty to defend, the objective reasonableness of an insurer’s decision to withhold consent to settlement is judged from the perspective of the insurer.  Apollo Education Group, Inc. v. National Union Fire Ins. Co. of Pittsburgh, PA, 2021 WL 710224 (Ariz. Feb. 17, 2021).

Continue Reading Where Policy Contains no Duty to Defend, Reasonableness of Insurer’s Decision to Withhold Consent to Settlement Judged from Insurer’s Perspective

The United States District Court for the District of North Dakota has held that an insurer had no duty to defend a claim under a lawyers professional liability policy where the insured had prior knowledge that a claim might be made and should have given notice of the potential claim prior to the policy’s effective date. ALPS Prop. & Cas. Ins. Co. v. Brehdal & Assoc., P.C., 2020 WL 6268043 (D.N.D. Oct 23, 2020). The court also held that the insurer was entitled to reimbursement of defense costs where the policy provided such a right, and the insurer reserved its rights to seek such reimbursement.

Continue Reading Prior Knowledge and Prior Notice Exclusions Barred Coverage For Legal Malpractice Claim